Vahagn Galstyan

Publications
Working Papers
Exchange Rates
CV
X'Y
Central Bank of Ireland
New Wapping Street
North Wall Quay
Dublin 1
Ireland

Working Papers

  • The Currency Composition of International Portfolio Assets, (with Caroline Mehigan and Rogelio Mercado), March 2017.

    Abstract: In this paper, we empirically assess the importance of gravity-type variables and measures of macroeconomic and financial volatilities in explaining portfolio holdings denominated across the main global currencies: US dollar (USD), euro (EUR), Pound sterling (GBP), Japanese yen (JPY) and Swiss franc (CHF). Our findings underscore the importance of trade ties and membership of the euro area. We also find that international positions co-move with the level of macroeconomic and financial uncertainty. Importantly, we identify heterogeneous patterns at a currency level.


  • Cross-Border Banking and Macroeconomic Determinants, (with Mary Everett), February 2017.

    Abstract: This paper studies the bilateral determinants of the international asset positions of banks, and subsequent bilateral adjustment during the global financial crisis and ensuing recovery phase. We find empirical support for traditional gravity-type variables. Exploiting a comprehensive dataset of bilateral bank assets, combined with a cross-country database on capital controls and macroeconomic policies, empirical evidence is provided for the effects of macroeconomic tools on the portfolio reallocation of internationally active banks. Specifically, higher current account balances in recipient countries are associated with higher inflows in debt assets, while restrictions on asset inflows and higher central bank reserves are related to lower cross-border flows of bank investment during the crisis and post-crisis periods, with heterogeneous effects across asset type. Finally, stronger institutions in recipient countries are positively associated with the international investment of banks, with inflows to debt assets being the most sensitive asset category across the financial cycle.


  • How Persistent are International Capital Flows?, January 2009.

    Abstract: This paper documents the dynamic properties of the current account, trade balance and international capital flows. For this purpose, two approaches are taken: probit and a nonparametric estimation. The probabilistic approach shows that, in general, deficits and net inflows tend to be more persistent than surpluses and net outflows. This result is robust to either specification of pooled and country-specific probits. The results of non-parametric estimation are in line with the results obtained from the probit.


  • Optimal Policy and the Sectoral Composition of Output in a New Keynesian Model, (with Michael Wycherley), March 2012.

    Abstract: This paper analyses optimal policy on the basis that the economy comprises a number of different sectors. It shows that the composition of output matters, that policy should take into account the source of shocks as well as their aggregate magnitude, and that policy tools impacting individual sectors can be significantly welfare improving. If sectoral policy is not adopted, then commitment in tax policy is important in similar ways and for similar reasons to commitment in monetary policy. With sectoral policy, commitment for tax and monetary policies ceases to be important.


  • Terms of Trade in the Medium-run, October 2011.

    Abstract: This paper contributes to empirical research on the dynamics of the terms of trade. We start by proposing a method for constructing different measures of the terms of trade. This is achieved by estimating a range of substitution elasticities using a panel data approach and highly disaggregated data on trade flows. Next, various measures of the terms of trade and trade margins are related to productivity and demand proxies. We find that domestic demand side movements are positively related to the terms of trade, while domestic productivity gains result in a deterioration of the terms of trade. Our results suggest that higher relative productivity raises the real component of exports relative to imports along the intensive margin inducing a weakening of the terms of trade.